-Careers Page (we ARE hiring!)

We are preparing for a busy fall. Please check out our Careers Page as we are actively hiring motivated team members in the Nashville, Bloomington, Columbus region. Check it often to see what positions we have available or go to the Contact Page to email us a resume directly. Applications are always available to be filled out in our office. Please share with anyone who would be interested in joining our team.

 

-Hardscape Installation (video)

This is a short video of a natural stone staircase project completed by Designscape in beautiful Brown County (fall of 2014).  After sorting through thousands of trail camera pictures we compiled them into this 2min  video.  Designscape excels in installations where the logistics and mobilization of equipment and materials are in difficult/hard to reach areas.  All 100+tons of material for this job had to travel a half mile down an old atv trail before reaching their final destination.

-WE ARE STILL PLANTING TREES!

The frigid temperature is providing us opportunities to plant specific varieties of hardy trees in normally high impact and hard to reach areas.  If you have a nice lawn and don’t want your grass torn up while planting a giant tree the crust of frost provides a great time to bring heavy equipment in.

Specifically DHS is planting hardy: spruce (Norway and White), oaks, maples, arborvitae, and select shrubs like winterberry holly and viburnum.

-Spring is here and going quickly!

Maple Leaves

As the rush of spring started late it looks like it may be short lived as well.  Now is the time to be checking for winter damage on all your landscape plants.  This includes those time tested favorites we all thought were zone hardy.  Here’s a link to a great video put out by our friends at Purdue to help explain the effects of old man winter.

 PURDUE PRESS RELEASE

-Bob’s Blog: Go NATIVE; don’t lose out! (drought-tolerant perennials)

Gardens that look good in fall work well all year long, gardeners in-the-know often say.

Many native plants tend to be deep-rooted, strutting their stuff, their blooms, in late summer and fall. These include asters, coneflowers, sunflowers, sneezeweed, bergamot, milkweeds, blazing stars, goldenrods, culver’s root, turtleheads, Joe Pye weed, cup plant, compass plant, wild senna and grasses such as big and little bluestem.

Other deep-rooted perennials offering earlycolor and interest include false indigo, sweet flags, irises, penstemons, celandine poppies and meadowsweet.

Using native plants in rain gardens, bioswales, prairie and wildflower gardens maximizes sustainability because they are tough, hardy and reliable. The gardener using native plants lowers the risk of losing plant stock during drought. Because many of these plants are so adaptable, they often weather rainy springs and winters common in our part of the country.

Other drought-tolerant plants include dry denizens such as Russian sage and other sages, lamb’s ears, sedum, hens-and-chicks, daylilies, and the long line of clumping, spreading plants that work well in herb gardens: lavender, rosemary, yarrow, artemesia, hyssop, oregano, thyme, catmint and calamint. Fragrant plants also have an advantage; they’re not popular with deer, which can’t stand their smelly aroma.

Gardening doesn’t have to mean buying expensive, high-maintenance, exotic plants that last only aseason or two. Don’t lose out; choose proven, adaptable performers that spread and stand up to adverse conditions.

Professional Landscapes